THE CONDITION OF ENGLAND QUESTION

... christening their children after the hero of the li minute. Thus, Da generation or so back, Henry re Hunts were as common as blackberries-a crop of hi leareus O'Connors replaced them-and latterly I' they have a few green sprouts labelled Ernest Jones. tb A ...

HOW DOKS A FLY BUZ?

... trunk might seem instrument convenient enough when inserted into saucer syrup, or applied to the broken surface of over-ripe blackberry, but we often see our sipper of sweets quite busy on a solid lump of sugar, which we shall find close inspection growing ...

Published: Tuesday 12 February 1850
Newspaper: Stonehaven Journal
County: Kincardineshire, Scotland
Type: Article | Words: 284 | Page: 7 | Tags: none

jFonign ICnuii

... , and with the assistance two large soup tureens, the numerous dishes were displayed. had, among other luxuries, fresh blackberries and bon-bons: the loiter were rather dry, and had no doubt travelled far. Each man had three-pronged iron fork, and regular ...

THE TOWN COUNCIL

... character within the reach of the young, they all knew that publications of an improper character were strewn abont thick as blackberries, and would fall into their hands. Unless there was some person or society to take the young hy the hand, were they not ...

Published: Saturday 16 February 1850
Newspaper: Sheffield Independent
County: Yorkshire, England
Type: Article | Words: 13049 | Page: 3 | Tags: none

JUVENILE DELINQUENTS

... so as to produce the anomaly. Yet it is impossible to judge each series except according to its own rule. A man picks a blackberry in the hedge ; from that he proceeds to pluck a nut; he next tears up a turnip; then digs a stalk of potatoes; finally he ...

Published: Saturday 23 February 1850
Newspaper: The Atlas
County: London, England
Type: Article | Words: 827 | Page: 11, 12 | Tags: none

WINTER

... may seem instrument convenient nonet) when inserted into a saucer or syrup, applied to the broken •urf ice of an over-ripe blackberry, but often see our sipper of swe -I# quite bnsy on solid lump of sugar, which shall find on cluS3 inspection growing small ...

the REV. MR HUXTABLE’S FARM

... seem an instrument convenient enough when inserted into a saucer or syrup, or applied to the biokcn surface of over-ripe blackberry, but we often see our sipper of sweets quite as busy a solid lump of sugar, which wc shall find on close inspection growing ...

Published: Friday 01 March 1850
Newspaper: Lincolnshire Chronicle
County: Lincolnshire, England
Type: Article | Words: 8486 | Page: 7 | Tags: none

THE POLITICAL EXAMINER

... the efficiency and dignity of the establishment ? We should then bear arguments against ma king Bishops as plentiful as blackberries, against making the plum-pudding of plums only, against vulgarising the dignity and frittering. away the weight of the ...

Published: Saturday 02 March 1850
Newspaper: The Examiner
County: London, England
Type: Article | Words: 11330 | Page: 1, 2, 3, 4 | Tags: News 

TIIE ATL A S

... it commenced. Reasons for the great wig fulminated against the Bengal colonels have been, for some time, plenty as blackberries. One authority describes it a fling at the departing conqueror of the Punjab, who has since arrived amongst us. Another ...

Published: Saturday 02 March 1850
Newspaper: The Atlas
County: London, England
Type: Article | Words: 1035 | Page: 8 | Tags: none

steeple-chase

... Second Race, to be made with Mr. Moo hi;, Donegall Arms. The decision of the Stewards to be final. Mr. Gildowney*® b.h. Blackberry (uu.) Mr. Gray (ns.) gr.b. Luca-. Mr. Smith (ns.) gr.h. Grande Lumiere. Mr. Thompson's b.h. Saul ,un. Mr. Connor’s b.g. ...

Published: Tuesday 05 March 1850
Newspaper: Northern Whig
County: Antrim, Northern Ireland
Type: Article | Words: 771 | Page: 3 | Tags: none

LECTURES

... France did before her first revolution. She has a swarm of nobility;— -counts being almost countless ; and barons rife as blackberries. The nobility are found in summer at watering-places, where they pass their time in smoking and gambling; and in winter ...

Published: Thursday 07 March 1850
Newspaper: Fife Herald
County: Fife, Scotland
Type: Article | Words: 4126 | Page: 4 | Tags: none

Tom Nettleship, gardener to the Rev, in. Musters, | at Colwick, and succeeded in getting the tiles from the roof,

... cutting some wood for garden purposes, in the Horse-pasture Wood, they promiscuously cut, from the side of an oak tree, a blackberry briar of the extraordinary length of 35 feet, and of last year’s growth. Blyth. —At a parish meeting, on Friday last, at ...