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Pall Mall Gazette

THE WINTER EXHIBITIONS

... other pictures by lady artists in this gallery may be mentioned the flower studies of Mrs. Duffield and Mrs. Harrison. The blackberries and honeysuckles, the heaths and bilberries, of Mrs. Duffield, painted in the open air, have all the freshness of autumnal ...

RECENT FRENCH CRITICISM

... his view, the most vigorous and most obnoxious emanation, lately complained that, although ideas are now as abundant as blackberries, the noble art of criticism is nearly clean gone, hinting that with M. Sainte Beuve's departure fromn the ,scene the whole ...

GUSTAVE III. ET LA COUR DE FRANCE

... is a member of the paragraph on the intensity of the alliance between France and Sweden, blunders lie almost as thick as blackberries-uno avulso, non deficit aller. Between i631 and 1648 some half-dozen treaties relating to the German war were indeed made ...

BAKER'S HISTORY OF ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE

... egarded ?? approval by those who inherit the morality of patl! age. In the sixteenth century they were as p'erty ful as blackberries, and wvcre not heeded ShortiY0. the first master of St. John's, became master ,- Pembroke, archdeacon of Bath, master of ...

PICTURES IN THE ROYAL ACADEMY

... which are here, but by the absence of the major work which we had hoped for. One of these small upright pieces, called Blackberry gathering,' is a master-piece of the most poetical kind in colour and design, with its two figures of girls climbing among ...

NEW BOOKS AND NEW EDITIONS

... kind : the tale of the Pioneer's Cottage, though somewhat dawdlingly treated, is original, graphic, and mildly tragic; Blackberry Farm (describing a site which Nature reclaims as her own) is naive and amusing. The fable about the narrator's Pegasus ...

WOMAN'S WRONG

... trees, &c., until she is as healthy and brown and active as any mother might desire. Their last exploit included a day's blackberry bunting, an expedition to a neighbouring fair, and a misadventure after- wards in consequence of assisting themselves on ...

COMIN' THRO' THE RYE.*

... P ii'i. (in one of the lucid intervals) that the month which is not t ?? PVC , nightingales is a trifle early for ripe blackberries. Wh\ile n:ilx itO l . things, man and wvomnan become creatures of clingin, lips, gici nda shoulders, and veils of rippling ...

COMIN' THRO' THE RYE

... remembered (in one of the lucid intervals) that the month which is not too late for nightingales is a trifle early for ripe blackberries. While nature does these things, man and woman become creatures of clinging lips, gleamiling ripe shoulders, and veils ...

PAROCHIAL ANNALS.*

... outside Tours. The weakest part of the book is the remnants of Cornisl. in tl: present speech of the people. Jfo.i'-an blackberries, mezirriaoi ants, ;1l l root, quale faded and dry, and many more words Mr. ?? nau have heard in the district where the ...

AFRICAN TRAVEL.*

... expressed with admirable truth and refinement. Among other flower pieces maybe mentioned (r59) by Miss Marrable, and a study of blackberries (88) by Miss Hopkinson. ...

LONDON IN THE JACOBITE TIME.*

... that the author of Robinson Crusoe was one of the most pitiful scoundrels of a time when spies and traitors were like blackberries. The present strike of the London masons, however much to be deplored, is not, at any rate, so unjustifiable as that of ...