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Sept’, it, 1880. bar two,” as plentiful as blackberries in this unusually-prolific blackberry-month. One of the ..

... Sept’, it, 1880. bar two,” as plentiful as blackberries in this unusually-prolific blackberry-month. One of the principal features of this meeting used to be the friendly rivalry which was brought to issue between North and South ; and the mind ol the ...

Published: Saturday 11 September 1880
Newspaper: Sporting Times
County: London, England
Type: Article | Words: 1027 | Page: 4 | Tags: none

LORD BRACKENBURY: A Novel

... everything. I am so worried The children Oh yes, the children are all right. I've sent them to hunt up blackberries for a blackberry pudding. Blackberries are over, of course but they don't know that, and it keeps them out of the way. And Mr. Pennefeather ...

GRECIAN THEATRE

... surrounded by servile toadies, calls a council for the consideration of a very important question. Unless the charmed blackberries, which are to renew the power of his kingdom for spreading venom and making human kind unkind to each other, be discovered ...

LORD BRACKENBURY: A Novel

... ng. I am so worried !- The children? Oh yes, the children are all right. I've sent them to hunt up blackberries for a blackberry pudding. Blackberries are over, of course-but they don't know that, and it keeps them out of the way. -And Mr. Pennefeather ...

Published: Saturday 08 May 1880
Newspaper: Graphic
County: London, England
Type: Article | Words: 8663 | Page: 14, 15, 16 | Tags: Arts & Popular Culture 

THE SOCIETY OF BRITISH. ARTISTS

... Frederick Morgan's Blackberries (No. 163) is again a picture of incident, but a picture also in which the interest of the landscape and the sturdy beauty of the picture depicted dispute import- ance with the avowed theme. The blackberry gatherer is worthy ...

Published: Monday 05 April 1880
Newspaper: London Evening Standard
County: London, England
Type: Article | Words: 1598 | Page: 6 | Tags: none

HALLEY'S MOUNT

... Peak, the culminating point of St. Helena. Here a few roughly-squared blocks of tufa, now over grown with wild-pepper and blackberry brambles, are all that remain to mark the site of Edmund Halley's observatory, where 200 years ago he noted the transit ...

Published: Saturday 28 February 1880
Newspaper: The Graphic
County: London, England
Type: Article | Words: 276 | Page: 30 | Tags: none

FOLKLORE OF SEPTEMBER

... Thus, in Staffordshire, there notion prevalent among the peasantry that the Devil always puts Ids cloven foot upon the blackberries this day. is considered, therefore, highly unlucky to gather any more during the remainder of the year —an idea which exists ...

Published: Saturday 04 September 1880
Newspaper: Illustrated London News
County: London, England
Type: Article | Words: 1305 | Page: 6 | Tags: none

FINE ARTS. SOCIETY OF BRITISH ARTISTS. The exhibition in the Snffolk-street galleries presents a further ..

... ladies have just retired (save one roguish listener) to tell some racy story—evinces progress. A rustic girl gathering Blackberries (163), by F. Morgan. No. 166, by T. K. Pelham—slight but picturesque in effect and colour. “Dutch Herring-Boats getting ...

Published: Saturday 03 April 1880
Newspaper: Illustrated London News
County: London, England
Type: Article | Words: 1220 | Page: 22 | Tags: none

“ SALLET-HERBES.”

... food. Good salads are made of green leaves and shoots, and of common weeds well. Thus in the young tops and leaves of the blackberry we have that salad which was common at the tables of the Greeks, who mixed with their lettuce, did the Romans, too, the ...

Published: Saturday 18 September 1880
Newspaper: Illustrated London News
County: London, England
Type: Article | Words: 1265 | Page: 14 | Tags: none

LORD BRACKENBURY: A Novel

... in rare varieties of ferns and mosses and as for pre-historic antiquities, dolmens, and so on, they are as plentiful as blackberries. You have not yet seen the Bride Stones or the Witches' Round Why, they are the lions of Braekenbury The Witches' Round ...

LORD BRACKENBURY: A Novel: THE DARK-FOLK

... stooping under a bundle of cut furze or a horde of shy little flaxen-polled savages beating the bushes in quest of a few late blackberries but sometimes they went for two or three miles without encountering a soul. More than once, a covey of partridges rose ...

ELEVEN STALL STABLE

... Cock, • brown gelding. 54. I'eter, • brown gelding. The above have been driven together, and in single harness. -- 55. Blackberry, • brown nob; quiet to ride and drive, with good action. The following Horses, that have been driven in a team and are ...

Published: Saturday 28 February 1880
Newspaper: Sporting Gazette
County: London, England
Type: Article | Words: 245 | Page: 4 | Tags: none