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THE MOORE CENTENARY CELEBRATIONS

... this mixed assembly, one who che- h frishes it deeplylwill not be forbidden:to speak. I h l speak of it as referring to an event long past-as tI an Englishman might speak of Runlymede or a b Scotehman of Bannockburn. Doring the long f} struggle for e ...

THE IRISH LANGUAGE

... present, because when their grandfathers were going'to school the speaking ot it wars made penal. The boys sad girls wore what was called a tally round their necks, and if they were known to speak a word of Irisbh a nick was put in the tally, which was made ...

THE IRISH LANGUAGE

... yezar since, Mr. John Fleming ac- )centuated the fact that in Irish-speAking districts the results fees earned for teachers by pupils are c.ensiderably higher than those in English-speak- ing. He gave in detail the statistics which bore out his contention ...

MR. PARNELL, M.P., AND THE REV. E. SHEEHY IN CORK

... feelings of pride, of confidonce, end of hope than at almost ,any previous period in our history. When we speak of Ireland as a nation, wo speak to some ex- tent of the future; but ever since the notion of natioltlood took possession of the Irish mind ...

THE IRISH LANGUAGE

... there take) intf theit service.those who can speak to them in' Irish or mingle with the natives for the same- purpose1 Will Irishlhotelkeeper:E'n those quarters'accommo. date their guests with Irish-'speaking servants ? or if families in tbe interior of ...

THE NATIONAL EXHIBITION

... state it, .and I request that you will hear me. Thae Exae- tive Committee, of which I am a member, author- 4sed no one to speak on their behalf. Mr. Gibson, MLP.-That is not a point of order. The Lord Ngayor-I hardly think that is a point ;of order, but ...

FESTIVAL OF ST. LAURENCE O'TOOLE

... inevitablc decav. 1MAXIMS 01' STATESMANiSIP. |But I fnd that I have digressed. Lord Ran- dolph Churchill-and wheu I speak of 1idm I speak equivalently of the party that he virtually ?? nioiduolph Churchill, I say, seems to have adopted as the great moving ...

LITERATURE

... on, d coming from the pen of an Englisbnrns.or a Soot ch- dchracterised by such qualities. It is not to their eto write or speak honestly of Ireland; axid we hail ;h pleasure the honest man who, when he comes amongst ,liags off the bigotry and prejudices ...

[ill] LITTERAIRES

... remean- l hered that Perikles lived iu a ntime of peace, w when nien cotuld afford te speak with majesty; buat Demnosthenes lived inl a timie of turmoil, l whell to speak asias to act; Lhs speeches brea'hed wtr.i and after 2.000 years had roiled by those ...

BOOKS OF THE DAY

... becaud'my practice was to speak without any relief from chalnge of tones, but always at the fall stretch of my jowers of voice, and strainitng my whole body to ?? utter- most. - They and the physicians urged me to give up speaking at the bar, but I felt ...

THE IRISH LITERARY THEATRE

... imiperishaleaP t is liue!.Plys and novels are, I think for the re a- mon= obut the bock I speak, of would he thle In isbegirnng tif -eatr . nbook of the kind- aL I speak of is the barettiug need of the moment, of cad wctuld he more lnelp to the rehabilitation ...

THEATRE ROYAL

... Sfrathlnore's decision, and Katharine, his long-loved f betrothed, thus addresses him:- t Halbert, speak to me- You'll not speak--shall I? Halbert-Yes, speak. t Katharine-Then answer; but not rashly- x For my doom is in your breath- You love meri Strath ...