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THE LITERATURE OF 1848

... at a meeting which was ad- dressed by a young man who promised to take a high place among his countrymen of that day, and, speaking with all the earnestness of youth, he said, This hand has of ten driven the plough and there are manyhere whoknow it ...

LITERATURE

... entertained by the speaker of everything base or dishonest. Of his manner of speaking the writer of the inemoir thus speaks: . Of Mr. Burrowes' manner and style of speaking, it would be difficult to convey a correct idea to those who have not seen him ...

LITERARY EXTRACTS

... Hear everything that speaks the language of your hearth and home!' 'And pleads for her? inquired the Carrier. ' All things that speak the language of your hearth and home must plead for her ?? returned the Cricket, 'For they speak the truth ' And while ...

THE KIICENNY CATTLE SHOW

... of Ireland, who has honoured us with hie presence here to-day (loud and continued ap. placse). It is difficult for me to speak in tbe presence 4 of his Excellency-it is more particularly so, perhaps, that I am connected with him by long ties ol frieud- ...

THE ROYAL HORSE AND CATTLE SHOW

... taken in a Wird'~eeye view of the geo. S graphy of the place, what is to be written as its 31 history ? It is, agriculturally speaking, an emi. C nently respectable show i such an one as uay well grace the action of the Royal Agrieul4tqral Society 'ere ...

THE GAELIC LEAGUE

... presence someone who will act. The language can quickly revived; the old speak it. and many the young know it. Whoie influence the League in felt the boys aud girls think it a disgrace to speak Gaelic. I found this feeling, bnt found also that it was easily removed ...

THEATRE ROYAL

... mankind. At the start we may'say that it would'be absurd to speak of Mr. Irving as of an ordiharg actor. He has foughthis way lnch'bb inch to'hitpresenteruinenee; he has had loeses, so to speak -iad he cannot be called the; creature of nu ?? ancy of re- ...

THE ROYAL HIBERNIAN ACADEMY

... Millais'brush it tells its story qt one-like nature it speaks for itself with a magic of its own. The great industry of his youth has given him the facility of his na- turity, and although Speak, Speak may not be named as amongst the greatest of his many ...

LITERATURE

... defionlinatiols, speaking at piublic rncetings, arid that wve rarely henr them, or any of thier, without a Eensation of ulisenehantseLut. The prra)li.l line of advance to tha same estimate is, that the gift of tolerenbly clear and impressive speaking invariably ...

THE IRISH LITERARY SOCIETY, LONDON

... preserved of the great Aryan languages. This literature, which flourished so long and was extinguished so suddenly, was, roughly speaking, the litera- ture of the entire Irish race down to the year 1600, of ninety-nine hundretbs of the race down to the year 1700 ...

EASTER SUNDAY

... you have been ?? enaqgh to. say ip;praisef su.e, but I can thaph Tou= ?? 0. ii] events for the feeling that proepwd yog k.speak of me as you. have spoken . _yoq w.d a~llw eatU soe , any lord, to express my thanks to you for the oppor-tnity your hospitality ...

REVIVAL OF AN ANCIENT GREEK PLAY AT OUR NATIONAL THEATRE

... little or no impression on the vulgar mind, and philosophy teaches not the multitude; bat the c drama, universally accessible, speaks to all; and, by com- t bining poetry, music, painting, sculpture, oratory, and philo- sophy, with those other arts and sciences ...