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AT- THEIR POSTS

... mntoal advantage Scotland and Ireland have just been speaking new gentleman London, ami I glad this diataucw to ta able speak tbs Lord of Bdiaburgb. and only wiab csuld hare opportunity of speaking to him closer terms Irish soil. The Lord Provoil—l very ...

THE IRISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

... at the same time would occupy the keenest and most scratinising intellects. Ho would urge that if they must speak English let them also speak Irish. Let them not shrink from employing Irish idioms, and let them borrow Irish metres and transfer them into ...

LITERATURE

... breeds, when merit is handicapped and depre- he ciated, and when offices which should be its re- ds ward and birthright, so to speak, are disposed of and manipulated in the interests of nepotism and 15cabal. n- Th& condition of the schools and the organisation ...

ROYAL DUBLIN SOCIETY'S CATTLESHOW

... cattle, sheep, swine, &c. &C., ;ofor 1849, was opened yestet day on the premises of the so- ciety, Kildare-street. Generally speaking, it may be stated Lthat the present exhibition far outrival~led any similar one that has preceded it, even under far more ...

THE NATIONL EXHIBITION OF IRISH MANUFACTURES

... its oxiatonee. Sornn ten dayso night ix~o th.is naovemient wzsn in plat. ot facet, initiated. Every one, ?? atone or lesi speak-ing if time rubjcct, and a few tien Lsaaernbhld at Orroonit-qo y~t to consider %whether any and what steps should h~o takcn ...

SPRING CATTLE SHOW

... as most perfect we may -soture to speak of those sent in by N. Barton, Esq., the Earl of Shannon Ca new exhibitor), Lord Duct- raven, &c. The fat cows also present a most attractive feature In the show. We can only speak of the specimens which ?? to challenge ...

MOUNT MELLERAY—ITS SCHOOLS—ANNUAL EXHIBITION

... said to Brother Philip, the porter- How can you t live without speaking ? We don't live without speaking, l said poor old Philip with much simplicity, but when we I want to speak we speak to God Almighty-could we converse 3 with anv one better ? Ab ...

LITERATURE

... only poet of Portugal. FIl speaks as if c impressed deeply with the sweetness of diction, exquisite I pathos, and glowing thought, which he claimed for the poetry of Camoens. Of the author of The Decameron he also x speaks with intense fondness. Not ...

THE ANTIENT CONCERTS

... night's audience need not be reminded. But it is of iitltejalusi,pr,ieu~ted to ~.bat audience last night tha~twe have uqnw~ to speak.' On ascertainn g tu'thW ogrammei' ki'dweeks d fpr~u~ and o ?? th'st'tfie--soclEtyv:had ,resolved' on, paul ?? n we wee driviie ...

LITERATURE

... little known arts of recitation and speaking which occupy very many pages of the goodlyjsized volume. In times when a graceful and cultivated delivery is an indispensable ac- complishment, and the ability to speak with ease and correctness may be to its ...

LITERATURE

... gentlemen in Europe. The sketch m of this honourable member (for whatever shire, city, or bo- s rough), though, generally speaking, impartial in its severity, dig outrageously unfair towards the Irish members. Mfight d, not Sheil, at least,' be included ...

THEATRE ROYAL

... sentimentalisms and dying strains of Bellini, with which for these last eight or nine years we have been deluged I We have now to speak of the manner in which it was per- formed on Saturday evening. Of Miss Kiemble's Susanna/h we have spoken already: it was a ...