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LITERATURE

... from Mr. Glondon's recapitulation, will show many of the points with which lie meets the statements of Mr. Gladstone:- You speak of twenty or thirty thousand political pri- soners, according to general belief, avowing, at the same time, that there can ...

LITERATURE

... Grafton-street; M'Gee, Nassau-street. The fact that this neat little treatise on horti- culture has reached its third edition speaks more eloquently for its worth than anything we could say in praise of it. It would be the most erroneous notion in the world ...

LITERATURE

... 85, it l was well known that he did not leave enough to bury him. c Of Dr. Eager's services to the church I am unable to ,t speak, not being acquainted with them. I know, however, n that he was neither so tall as Dr. Moody, nor so fat as Dr. Troy, nor so ...

THE ITALIAN OPERA

... Dublin, we can recall no Instance wherein a grand opera eeria was more Y tastefully brought out, or it muaslo, generally speaking, more brilliantly executed than on the occasion of the presentation. of Il grovatore last night. Fortunately for t our readers ...

MUSIC-HALLS

... prophet in Jingo jingler and their titleI from his song. Of the musio-hall so&rs that are miertly inane there is no need to> speak, thgh they constitute a large proportion of the pro-' gramme. Each year a new one appears, do- minating all others. It is sang ...

PERSONAL SKETCHES

... ambitious a task as the delineation of his political character, or the history of his military achievements, I shall have to speak of him in situations wherein he would appear but as an ordinary man, were these the only situations in which he had been known ...

THE GREAT EXHIBITION

... the world, which was dispersed far and wide at the sale of his grace's property at Stoure. The three l specimens of which we speak, being entailed, could not be I disposed of at the auction, and will nov be regarded with much interest on account of their ...

MR. GLADSTONE AT THE WORKMEN'S EXHIBITION

... not accidental and occasional, 1 but is uniform and invariable. I am not now speaking of the gorgeous works which were produced in the later middle ages, but I am l speaking of^ those works wvhich on thne contrary i present perhaps most of all the character ...

LITERATURE

... continually the lack of something closelv in touch With nature, because tile most French of all FrensehusIen bad forgotten how to speak. The Revolution has made them ; and to this dav the heirs of the Itepubl c wonder at the peasan:. in his resurrection. Froin ...

MR. GLADSTONE ON BOOKS

... circum- stances of the time, but which often becomes our snare. By speaking I mean export, by reading I mean import (laughter). You remember the saying of Lord Bacon about speak- mng, which made a ready man, and reading, which made a fuli miza. ...

LITERATURE

... which part appears to have been added after the publication of Mr- Petrie's large quarto on the round towers, Mr. D'Alton, in speaking of that work, mentions it as one of long applied, deep, and valuable research among the repositories of native literature ...

THE NATIONAL EXHIBITION AT CORK

... irresistible (cheers). It is not often that the repre- i sentative of sovereignty in this country has an opportunity I of speaking to those whom lie governs; rarely, if ever, to an i assemblage such as this; but I seize on it with the greatest i eagerness ...