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THE CONSPIRACY TO MURDER

... they could not hear the witness. Mr. Justice O'Brien-You really must speak louder and ailow the jury to hear you distinctly. Mr. O'Brien-Speak up to the jury ; look at I them and speak out. Nowy, how long before the 6th of May weas it that you were with ...

THE STATE TRIALS

... write what is . upon that slip of paper while Mr. O'Connell was speaking ? c Yes. . Upon your oath was that wrotten down upon that piece of paper from the lips of ir. O'Connell while he was speak. t i ing it ? Yes, occasionally takiag a note, and catching ...

THE EXTRAORDINARY MARRIAGE CASE

... onsall to you might nth oois? best' I speak of 'Lor' so. not. b' to ave T'~DI yolrrlefgmon~y,wi;!hi4dle Bhe vyou upto Dub-_ ?? 1ii and bngitback'd.giveit to he again? Il di eat. n :, Did you get any moayatAll?- If you speak of 80 1. toile. Ddyougt0v o ,1. ...

SPECIAL COMMISSION

... heard them speaking to the people ; there were about two or three hundred persons there; I did not b hear what those gentlemen said; I put the horse to my car . that ev-eing again about six o'clock; I heard Mr. Meagher v and Mr. Dillon speak to the people ...

THE STATE TRIALS

... it affords me very great pleasure to speak to you here in my native caunty. Throughout a short career it has been my lot to speak to many men, h ut nevrer until to-day have I had the same im- pressious when I speak to my own countrymen (cheers), We have ...

JUDICIAL COMMISSION ON THE TIMES'CHARGES

... politi'al movements of this century. lb dealing I with them, I again repeat it, I sball in no sense speak from a party point of view. I shall have to speak of movements perfectly constitutional and of movementa unconstitutional and against the law. I wrill ...

THE STATE TRIALS

... constitutional principle.- ?? saidthathecouldfind aeaseinpoint. Hewas speaking of a totally different subject from that of which the Attorney-General was speaking. He was speaking of the great constituitional prinaiple'propounded in the ILish parliament ...

THE GOVERNMENT PROSECUTIONS

... goverlnuseit Of Ire- land[ is to be thle goverinmlent of a natioll relying oil the Irisll peop1e themnselves, anti when I speak of them, I speak, not of is rabble or at mob, but of its aristocrley', its gentry, its mlid- (110 classes, its educated professionsal ...

LAW INTELLIGENCE

... the ward, and 1 leant over to speak to him I told him what I had suggested to Byrne; I asked Father Sinnott did he approve of that ; eseaid hedid. and Father Sinnott then went away to another ward, and I -,entback to speak to Byrne, who was sitting at ...

THE SPRING ASSIZES

... jade, or tried to make, for he was too drunk to speak coherently, an unfounded and ancalled for per- sonal attack on respected members of the Independent party in Cloiamel. Mr Condon had no more right to speak ther than any other o the persons who acted as ...

THE RECENT ARRESTS

... the only man in ag - that' house who can speak. If you were in the House of Commons, you would see Mr. Gladstone, who used to speak veryvet well, and Mr. Bright, and Mr. Cowen, the member Ifor Newcastle, who speaks better? I cannot draw an any distinction ...

THE ACTION OF CORNWALL V. O'BRIEN, M.P

... and did I not speak to him. a. Did you not goup and speak to himn ? I did! notgo up. He came-he was at the door speak- h kg to a lady and stretched out his hand, and I took it as I could not well pass without seeing him. ItDid you. speak- to him afterwards ...